Queue Toasts the 81st Golden Globe Nominees
Leonard Bernstein (Bradley Cooper) conducts an orchestra.

And the Golden Globe Nominees Are . . .

Queue toasts the record-breaking firsts and beloved favorites honored by the 81st Golden Globes.

Photograph by Jason McDonald
11 December 202310 min read

This morning in Los Angeles, California, the Golden Globes announced the nominations for their 81st annual awards ceremony. Netflix garnered a total of 28 nods: 13 for film and 15 for series. On the film side, Maestro and May December led the Netflix nominees with four each, including Best Motion Picture - Drama, and Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy, respectively. On the series side, The Crown, which recently kicked off its final season, led with four nominations across the drama categories, with limited series BEEF earning three nominations, including Best Television TV Limited Series, Anthology Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television

The 81st edition of the Golden Globes will air on Sunday, January 7, 2024, at 5 p.m. P.T./8 p.m. E.T.

Maestro

Leonard Bernstein (Bradley Cooper) and Felicia Montealegre Cohn Bernstein (Carey Mulligan) stand together in this elegant black-and-white picture.

Leonard Bernstein (Bradley Cooper) and Felicia Montealegre Cohn Bernstein (Carey Mulligan)

Photograph by Jason McDonald

Maestro, the sweeping film that depicts the epic love story of Leonard Bernstein and Felicia Montealegre Cohn Bernstein across three decades, was nominated for Best Motion Picture - Drama. Bradley Cooper, who took on the Herculean task of double duty behind and in front of the camera, is a triple nominee — nominated for Best Director - Motion Picture, Best Performance by a Male Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama, and Best Motion Picture - Drama as a producer. In the Best Performance by a Female Actor in a Motion Picture Drama category, Carey Mulligan garnered a nomination for her role as Felicia. 

For more, go behind the scenes of the making of Maestro, and read about how Cooper and Mulligan achieved the perfect duet in Queue’s latest cover story.

May December

Gracie Atherton-Yoo (Julianne Moore) and Elizabeth Berry (Natalie Portman) stand in front of a mirror applying lipstick.

Gracie Atherton-Yoo (Julianne Moore) and Elizabeth Berry (Natalie Portman)

Todd Haynes’s dark comedy May December finds TV actor Elizabeth Berry (Natalie Portman) studying Gracie Atherton-Yoo — who met her now husband Joe when she was 36 and he 13 — to play her in a movie about the couple’s tabloid-ridden past. For her portrayal of Elizabeth, Natalie Portman was nominated for Best Performance by a Female Actor in a Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. Julianne Moore, a longtime collaborator of Haynes’s, was nominated for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture for her portrayal of Gracie. And for his stunning breakout role as Joe, Charles Melton earned his first Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture.

For more, read about Portman’s journey to capture the meta-narrative at the heart of the film, tune into Moore’s episode of Skip Intro, and read about Melton and the cast’s creative journey in a roundtable discussion at the film’s L.A. premiere. 

NYAD

Bonnie Stoll (Jodie Foster) and Diana Nyad (Annette Bening) embrace in ankle-deep water.

Bonnie Stoll (Jodie Foster) and Diana Nyad (Annette Bening)

Photograph by Kimberley French

NYAD, the tale of Diana Nyad’s singular life as a record-setting long-distance swimmer, earned two nominations. For her turn as the titular character, Annette Bening was nominated for Best Performance by a Female Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama and Jodie Foster was nominated for Best Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture for her portrayal of Bonnie Stoll, Nyad’s coach and steadfast confidante. The film is the first narrative feature from directors Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin, the Academy Award-winning duo known for documentaries Free Solo and The Rescue

For more, dive into the physical and mental transformation that Bening underwent to portray Nyad, and read about how Bening and Foster captured the camaraderie and perseverance at the core of the film.

Rustin

Bayard Rustin (Colman Domingo) walks up the Lincoln memorial steps.

Bayard Rustin (Colman Domingo)

Photograph by Parrish Lewis

In his first leading role as Bayard Rustin, the unsung civil rights activist and organizer of the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Colman Domingo was nominated for Best Performance by a Male Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama for Rustin. Helmed by Director’s Guild Award-winning director George C. Wolfe (Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom) and produced by Wolfe, Academy Award-winner Bruce Cohen, and Higher Ground Productions’ Tonia Davis, the film captures the personal turmoils and triumphs that Rustin faced as an openly gay man at the center of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. The film’s soul-stirring song “Road to Freedom,” written by Grammy Award winner Lenny Kravitz, was nominated for Best Original Song - Motion Picture. 

For more on the road to Rustin, read Domingo’s recent Queue cover story and unpack the rich musical inspirations behind “Road to Freedom.”

Society of the Snow

Society of the Snow cast members stand around the set: a crashed plane in a snowy expanse.

Society of the Snow cast members

Photograph by Quim Vives

Society of the Snow, which tells the remarkable tale of ​​Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571’s crash in the Andes Mountains in 1972, was nominated for Best Motion Picture - Non-English Language. Helmed by Goya Award-winning director J.A. Bayona and starring Enzo Vogrincic as Numa Turcatti, the film is a captivating adaptation of Pablo Vierci’s nonfiction book, La sociedad de la nieve

Go behind the scenes of the making of this real-life tale of heroic survival.

The Crown

Queen Elizabeth (Imelda Staunton) and Princess Diana (Elizabeth Debicki) in a quiet, dark moment.

Queen Elizabeth (Imelda Staunton) and Princess Diana (Elizabeth Debicki)

The Crown made history by earning nominations every year it was eligible, with the sixth and final season garnering four nominations including in the Best Television Series - Drama category. Imelda Staunton, who plays the show’s matriarch, Queen Elizabeth, was nominated in the Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Drama category, while Dominic West and Elizabeth Debicki, who play Charles and Diana, respectively, earned nods for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Drama and Best Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role on Television respectively. 

Get ready to say goodbye to The Crown, toast Staunton’s final incarnation of the queen, and hear from the People’s Princess actor Debicki in Issue 15.

BEEF

Amy (Ali Wong) and Danny (Steven Yeun) stagger through a dark tunnel, bloodied and dirty.

Amy (Ali Wong) and Danny (Steven Yeun)

Photograph by Andrew Cooper

Lee Sung Jin’s explosive breakout series BEEF, which follows the trajectory of two disparate characters in the wake of a road rage incident, earned a nomination for Best Television Limited Series, Anthology Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television. Ali Wong and Steven Yeun, who play the warring duo at the heart of this SoCal-set dramedy, also earned nominations for their work in the Best Performance by an Actor and Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series, Anthology Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television categories.

To learn more about Lee, read about the first-time showrunner’s unlikely sources of inspiration. And to hear from Yeun and Wong, take a look at their cover story.

All the Light We Cannot See

Werner (Louis Hofmann) and Marie-Laure (Aria Mia Loberti) embrace.

Werner (Louis Hofmann) and Marie-Laure (Aria Mia Loberti)

Photograph by Atsushi Nishijima

Shawn Levy’s four-part adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II novel — starring Mark Ruffalo, Hugh Laurie, Aria Mia Loberti, and Louis Hofmann — earned a nomination for Best Television Limited Series, Anthology Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television.

Learn more about the charismatic leads of the miniseries.

The Diplomat

Kate Wyler (Keri Russell) walks alongside some dudes in suits looking like a boss.

Kate Wyler (Keri Russell)

Photograph by Alex Bailey

Debora Cahn’s edge-of-your-seat drama, The Diplomat, which follows an American diplomat in England juggling high-stakes foreign affairs, earned a nod in the Drama Series category. The genre-defying series’ star, Keri Russell, also earned a nomination for Best Performance by an Actress. 

Dive deeper into the razor-sharp series and hear why Russell agreed to such a physically and mentally challenging role.

Stand-Up Comedy

Wanda Sykes looks fabulous in a patterned jacket.

Wanda Sykes

Photograph by Aaron Ricketts

Netflix claimed five of the six nominations in the inaugural Best Performance in Stand-up Comedy on Television category, with Chris Rock, Wanda Sykes, Trevor Noah, Amy Schumer, and Ricky Gervais earning nods for their specials.

Read more about Rock’s first stand-up special in five years and Sykes’s witty-as-ever Wanda Sykes: I’m an Entertainer.